September 30, 2014

Silver Alert program proving to be successful

Gov. Scott Walker signed legislation in April creating the Silver Alert system. (Photo: DOJ)

Gov. Scott Walker signed legislation in April creating the Silver Alert system. (Photo: DOJ)

Wisconsin’s Silver Alert program is already successful in its first two months of operation. That’s according to Joseph Libowsky from the Wisconsin Department of Justice, which administers the program.

Libowsky says the Silver alert program helps find people that are usually lost and alone. “When we created the Silver Alert program, the easiest way to explain it is it’s very similar to the Amber Alert program, but it’s for vulnerable, generally elderly people. I think because they were familiar with the Amber Alert program, they were more than willing to jump on board.”

The Silver Alert program utilizes several ways to get the message out to the public, including radio and television, electronic media, and a network of businesses. Since beginning seven weeks ago, the program has been used often. “The Silver Alert program in Wisconsin became active on August 1st. We have had six Silver Alerts go out and four of those people have been safely recovered. Two of those individuals are still missing.”

One resource most people may not realize is the department’s partnership with the Wisconsin Lottery. Silver Alerts including photos will appear on lottery terminals, and store clerks have to acknowledge the alert before they are allowed to perform a customer transaction. Libowsky says that tool recently found a Brookfield man. “The alert was sent out through a variety of channels including the lottery, and it just so happened that the missing individual, Mr. (Patrick) Looby went into a gas station to ask for directions back to Brookfield, and literally about ten minutes later, the Silver Alert came out. A clerk recognized him and called police.”

Looby was found less than two hours after being spotted. “Thirty minutes later, he walked into a grocery store where they had just seen the Silver Alert. They recognized him while he was in the grocery store. They called police and he was safely recovered.”

Individuals and businesses can received emails, texts, and faxes for Silver Alerts and Amber Alerts for free. The information is available on their website. The two people that remain missing are Ms. Nejay Redd from Madison and Mr. Robert Osborn from Oak Creek.

WSAU

World Dairy Expo set to open in Madison

(Photo: World Dairy Expo)

(Photo: World Dairy Expo)

Madison will become the center of the dairy universe this week, as the World Dairy Expo begins its five-day run.

State Agriculture Secretary Ben Brancel calls the event a “gem” for Dane County and Wisconsin, attracting up to 70,000 people to various activities during the week. Visitors come from across the country and from more than 90 foreign countries.

The economic impact of the show in the Madison area alone is estimated at over $15 million. Brancel says it helps other areas as well, since many trade groups hold their annual meetings in Wisconsin this time of year to take advantage of the show. Many visitors also travel to agricultural vendors and operations around the state, where they tour facilities and purchase products.

The expo is Tuesday through Saturday.

WIBA

Passenger killed after tire crashes through windshield near Madison

(File photo: WRN)

(File photo: WRN)

A suburban Chicago man is dead, after a freak accident early Monday morning near Madison on Interstate 39/90.

The Wisconsin State Patrol says a tire came off of an eastbound vehicle and was then thrown into the westbound lanes, crashing through the windshield of a car and striking a passenger. The driver of the vehicle then lost control and slid into a concrete barrier along the interstate. The crash happened at about 1:20 this morning.

The passenger, a 55-year-old man from Lombard Illinois, died at the scene. The driver of the vehicle hit by the tire, a 56-year-old man, was not hurt.

WIBA

Cooler weather to bring intrusive pests

Box elder bugs (PHOTO: Jackie Johnson)

Box elder bugs (PHOTO: Jackie Johnson)

Cool fall weather also means more pests are trying to get indoors. Randy Allen from Wil-Kil Pest Control says it’s not just the bugs that are looking for a warm place to spend the winter. “It includes bugs and rodents, mice in particular, but right now, we’re going to be seeing, and particularly as we go from the north part of the state to the southern part of the state, we’re going to see what we call the hibernating insects start to move towards structures.”

As far as bugs go, Allen says there are a few that cause trouble every year. “Three big targets that we have this time of the year beginning with the Asian Lady Beetles. The other ones are Cluster Flies and Box Elder Bugs, all of which are looking to find somewhere in eaves, peaks, and soffits, or any void area they can find where they can get into a home or business.”

Allen says property owners need to do a fall inspection, and seal any crack or hole that can let pests into your building. “We’re looking for anything that’s going into the home, any kind of conduit like from a central air conditioning unit, utility meters, things like that. Anything that’s going into the home, you’re going to want make sure it’s sealed around there. Bugs don’t need a lot to get in. A mouse only needs about a quarter of an inch.”

One of the most commonly forgotten problem areas where pests enter homes is through bad door sweepers and seals, especially garage door seals. “What I’ll do, is I’ll take a number two pencil and see if I can slide it underneath any kind of door sweep, and if you can, that’s about the size of a small mouse being able to squeeze its way in.”

Allen says caulking, weather stripping, vent screens, and door seals go a long way in keeping your home or business pest-free.

WSAU

Unity man arrested after standoff with cops

File photo

File photo

A Unity man is in the Marathon County jail after an early Saturday morning standoff with deputies.

Deputies were sent to the scene around 4:15 in the morning after the man barricaded himself into a second story bedroom with two juvenile girls and refused to come out. Deputies arrived and performed a forced entry into the bedroom to arrest the man without injury to himself or the girls.

The man admitted to deputies he was under the influence of methamphetamine and said he thought people were coming to do him harm.

The suspect is now being held on a probation hold and on preliminary charges of false imprisonment, recklessly endangering safety, misdemeanor disorderly conduct, criminal damage to property, and false use of 911.

The man’s identity and formal charges will be released at an initial appearance on Monday.

WSAU